All posts filed under: Things for Health

My Favorite New Products Now Available at the MoMA Store

Last week I got to get a sneak peek at the new products available at the MoMA store in New York City and through its online shop. Here, in no particular order, are my five favorite new gifts, gadgets, and gear now available through the store. 1. Amish Scooter This scooter-bicycle hybrid has been crafted by the Stoltzfus family, an Amish family in Pennsylvania, since 1978. This substantial scooter lets adults move on two wheels without worrying about balance and knee strains. It comes with a kickstand, basket, and rear brake and handbrake with black or orange powder-coated steel frame and fenders. I’m partial to the orange myself. Black, $360, Orange, $320. 2. Porthole Infuser Designed by the Chicago-based design firm Crucial Detail, the shape of this table-ready infusion vessel was inspired by submarine portholes. It can be used to create and hold 13 ounces of cocktails, infused oils, dressings, or whatever you want to conjure. Made of tempered glass, ABS, stainless steel, and silicone, the Porthole Infuser is dishwasher safe and comes with four recipes to get you started.  2” wide x 7″ …

Sense Sleep Tracker

The Sense sleep tracker from Hello, which begins shipping to consumers next month, raised an astounding $2.4 million on Kickstarter in August to become the 6th most funded tech campaign in the crowdfunding site’s history. Taking a different approach to “wearables” that can only track your sleep patterns when they are on your body, Sense is intended to fade into the background and let you just focus on the task at hand — sleeping. The design of the polycarbonate shell was inspired by architecture, in fact Sense resembles a little egg that would have rolled out of Beijing’s iconic “birds nest” Olympic stadium. Sense comes with a little device called a Sleep Pill that attaches to your pillow and invisibly tracks your sleep movements at night. In case you were wondering, the manufacturer says that the unit “absolutely does not” track movements related to sex. The unit’s high-precision sensors are so sensitive, however, they are able to identify noise (from snores in your bedroom to car alarms on the street); pick up on light disturbances; monitor temperature and humidity conditions; and even see particulates in …

H20 Pal Smart Water Bottle

According to a recent study by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 43% of American adults drink less than four cups of water a day. A shocking 7% drink none. So is the H20 Pal water bottle from EQUA the solution to our dehydration problem? Made of a laboratory grade borosilicate glass bottle and a stainless steel cap, H20 Pal uses an accelerometer and weight sensor in the detachable base, along with an App, to help you keep track of how much water you are consuming. While the bottle itself is not complicated to use, you do have to log into the password-protected app in order to track your water consumption. The App also lets you know when you are properly hydrated, when you last filled your bottle, when you last took a sip, and allows you to compare how much your friends are drinking. So is this the solution for a thirsty nation or an overly convoluted drinking container? Check out the designer’s Kickstarter page and let me know what you think.

800W Design Wheelchairs

Unless you or someone close to you needs one, wheelchair design isn’t one of those things that’s usually top of mind. But there are few other product design areas where a well-designed product can have such an important influence on someone’s life and health (check out my recent story on a line of sexy, modern canes). That’s why I got excited when I got a pitch from Brandon Fonville with 1800wheelchair.com, a company specializing in mobility aides. Last month the company launched 800W Design, a new brand that will take a fresh approach to the aesthetics of wheelchairs, including the addition of new colors and custom stitching. I asked Brandon a few questions about the new line, and how it stands out from the rest of the designs on the market. DT: What inspired your modern take on the wheelchair? Brandon Fonville: After 15 years of selling wheelchairs and mobility products from other manufactures, I was always bothered by the aesthetics of some of the products; especially wheelchairs, walkers, and canes. Most products we interact with on a daily basis have a certain aesthetic value that gets more designed over time. Why should wheelchairs be any different? …