All posts filed under: Things for Installations

Hilma af Klint Capsule Collection at the Guggenheim MuseumStore

A new collection of products inspired by the works of Hilma af Klint (1862–1944) will be available for purchase at the Guggenheim Museum Store in fall 2018. Klint was a Swedish artist and mystic whose paintings were among the first examples of abstract art. The products were created in celebration of Hilma af Klint: Paintings for the Future, the first major solo exhibition in the United States of the Swedish artist at the Guggenheim Museum from October 12, 2018 to February 3, 2019. Created in close collaboration with a female-driven roster of designers and artisans, the collection will feature apparel, jewelry, accessories, and home goods, as well as a suite of postcards, large format posters, and more. Designs by Michele Quan, Margaret and Colleen Clines, Karen Konzuk, and Maya Luz, among others, and will be available exclusively in-store through the Guggenheim Store and online beginning October 11, 2018.   Images courtesy of Guggenheim Museum Store.

Book Signing at Brooklyn Designs!

On Friday May 6th at 7:30 I will be signing copies of my new book on erotic product design, Objects of Desire, at Brooklyn Designs at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint! We are excited to support Brooklyn design and the designers featured in our book who are based in the borough, including HEFF, Wonderpuss Octopus, and Dame Products. Brooklyn Designs is part of NYCxDESIGN, a world-class design festival which takes place May 3-17 throughout New York City. The three-day event kicks off on Friday at 10:00 am with “Kickstarter Office Hours” to present your ideas to the Director of Design and Technology Outreach at Kickstarter, and wraps up Sunday at 5:00 pm with a Maker’s Lab to teach designers how to promote themselves. In between are installations, pop-ups, seminars, and other fun events. I will be participating in the Opening Night Party from 7-9 pm, hosted by The Brooklyn Chamber of Commerce, Metropolis, and Benjamin Moore, and sponsored by Broadway Stages. There will be food, drinks, music, and a cornhole tournament featuring one-of-a-kind boards from …

Dirty Little Secrets Print Series by Sarah Rosado

How dirty do you like your art? Even though her pieces are G-rated, the New York-based illustrator and photographer Sarah Rosado hopes you like it really dirty. That’s because her photos are of actual dirt. Inspired by photography that transforms food, flowers, or other objects into art, Rosado decided to create unique images out of an unlikely source. “I felt it would be challenging for me to come up with an idea to shape dirt into everyday objects and accessorize it to create a 3D effect,” says Rosado. “Each image has its own meaning.” The project, titled Dirty Little Secrets, includes a range of art prints—a cat, umbrella, and taxi are a few examples—made predominately of dirt. The gallery quality Giclée prints are on natural white, matte, ultra smooth, 100% cotton rag, acid- and lignin- free archival paper using Epson K3 archival inks. They are custom-trimmed with 1″ border for framing and come in sizes ranging from 9” x 8” to 22” x 28”. Prints start at $26.00 and go up to $52, depending on size. …

Saving the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum

Jim Moran got some bad news last October while he was preparing for the Hamilton Wood Type & Printing Museum’s annual conference in Two Rivers, Wisconsin. Moran, who is director of the world’s only museum dedicated to the preservation, study, production, and printing of wood type, was told by his landlord that the museum had six months to find a new home. The news wasn’t entirely a shock. Moran and his small team had noticed that the building owner, lab equipment manufacturer Thermo Fisher Scientific, had begun downsizing the employees that shared the massive building, which was rapidly deteriorating. The museum, which was founded in 1999, took up 12,000-square-feet (with an additional 25,000 for storage) of the three-block long, 1.3 million-square-foot facility that the Hamilton Manufacturing Company had built, and added to, from 1910 to 1926. The manufacturer had donated free rent, lighting, and heat to the museum, but they were now closing their Two Rivers plant and moving production elsewhere. (MORE AFTER PHOTOS) Moran had to quickly raise the estimated $250,000 needed to pack …