All posts tagged: Areaware

Areaware Spring 2015 Collection

Brooklyn-based Areaware presented their Spring 2015 collection at the NY NOW show this week in New York City. During my visit to the show last Sunday, I stopped by Areaware’s busy booth showcasing work by designers Runa Klock, Joe Doucet, Bryce Wilner, Daniel Martinez, Daphna Laurens, Brendan Ravenhill, Bower, and Object + Totem. Here is a roundup of some of my favorite new designs on display during the show, which wraps up tomorrow at the Javits Center. 1. Bottle Openers by Brendan Ravenhill These clever bottle openers use a single bent nail as a lever to pry open your beer or soda bottle. A small circular magnet on the top catches the bottle cap, while a second magnet lets you hang the opener on the fridge when you are done. 2. Stick-Up Sticks by Bower These simple magnets are cut at various angles so they point in different directions when attached to your metal surface of choice. Made of painted beech wood and magnets, they can add a bit of color and function to lockers, fridges, …

The Alarm Dock for the iPhone 5

Designed by New York City-based industrial designer Jonas Damon for Areaware, the Alarm Dock is made of sustainably harvested, new growth beech wood to mimic the classic bedside alarm clock. Simply download the flip clock app, insert the phone into the dock (the connector can be pulled through so the phone, or iPod, can be charged while in use). Note that this is a simple holder for your phone, and does not come with built-in electronics or speakers. Here is a video of how it works. The Alarm Dock, designed for the thinner profile of the iPhone 5, measures 6.75 x 3.5 x 2.5. It is available in a rainbow of colors for $40 from Areaware.

Animal Boxes

These hinged Animal Boxes by American designer Karl Zahn for Areaware can work as a toy, treasure box, sculpture, or lucky charm. Made from sustainably harvested, new-growth Beech wood, the line includes a Bull, Rhino, Whale, Llama, Walrus, and Polar Bear to represent “power animals” or totems. Native American, Chinese, and other cultures associate certain animals with symbolic meaning; one could represent wisdom or creativity, for example. As a working mother, I’m going to go with the llama, as they are beasts of burden known for their endurance. Available in the U.K. from the British design house SCP  and in the U.S. through Areaware.

Strida bike

I’m a huge fan of Brooklyn-based Areaware, but I was surprised to see they have a bicycle in their collection. Well, not just any bicycle. The Strida bike features a lightweight aluminum frame, with power transferred to the rear wheel via a Kevlar belt. The bike folds up for easy storage or transport —  which is a good idea as this bike wouldn’t last five minutes on the street. It looks like it would be a fun ride, but I’m not sure if I would want to draw that much attention to myself — I might get nervous and fall off. Strida just got a big honor as a 2011 Best of Green Award Winner from Treehugger, my favorite blog focusing on sustainability. Strida is $650 and comes in multiple color options.