All posts filed under: Things for Growing

LA Urban Farms Vertical Garden Growing System

Founded in 2013, LA Urban Farms offers a vertical garden system which can grow vegetables, fruits, herbs and edible flowers, with no gardening experience necessary. These space-saving vertical gardens only require 30 inches of space and use aeroponic technology which grows plants in an air or mist environment without the use of any soil. The reservoir at the base holds nutrient-rich water, which is pumped to the top of the garden, showering the roots of all the plants along the way, without the use of any harmful chemicals. All the seeds used by LA Urban Farms are 100% organic and non-GMO. The gardens are made from FDA food grade-approved plastic, and can help earn LEED points. The gardens also use 90% less water than conventional gardening, because the water is being recirculated in the system until the plants absorb it or it evaporates, and they use 90% less space because they are growing vertically. LA Urban Farms offers gardens in a variety of sizes, from smaller sizes perfect for growing fresh produce at home, to …

Accessories by Revolution Design House

I met the folks behind Revolution Design House during last May’s ICFF exhibition in New York City. The brand was part of the Design Milk “Milk Stand” of curated vendors selling items on the show floor. I liked the modern style and quirky take on handcrafted pieces including salt cellars, candles, plant holders, and other pieces, all made in Portland, Oregon. Here are a few of my favorite pieces from the collection. For more info, visit. http://revolutiondesignhouse.com/shop/. All images courtesy Revolution Design House.

Kikkerland’s China Design Challenge

At an event held last month at the company’s shop in Manhattan, Kikkerland presented finalist designs from the Kikkerland China Design Challenge, an competition held in collaboration with Beijing Design Week Organization and Redstar Design Fund. Held during Bejing Design Week 2014, the theme of the challenge was “A Passage Into Design,” which encouraged young talented Chinese designers to present unique ideas based on Chinese heritage, history and mythology. The ideas also had to exhibit the quirky sense of humor and wit characteristic of Kikkerland Design. Nearly 1,000 design submissions were received, from which 30 were selected and prototyped during a workshop with professionals. Ultimately, 17  finalists were chosen from the challenge. During the New York event, an award was presented to challenge winner  Zhou Yi, who designed the Hutong Eraser, an eraser that represents the disappearing traditional architectural style that was once prominent in Beijing. “As the streets of Beijing are filled with more and more high-rise buildings, there are less and less Hutong style streets left,” says Yi. “The eraser will disappear as you use it, like the the disappearing Hutong.” The eraser, along with eight other finalists’ designs, will be produced and sold worldwide …