All posts filed under: innovation

Gramovox Bluetooth Gramophone

While this isn’t the first time a gramaphone has been adapted to amplify digital music, this is the first bluetooth-enabled version that I’ve spotted on the market. The Gramovox is not only a piece of home decor and an obvious conversation starter, but a new technology that offers the bold design and vintage sound of a 1920s gramophone to accompany any kind of music on your bluetooth-enabled device.  When sound waves spread up from the wood base and through the S-curve horn (a 3:4 reproduction of the 1920s R3 Magnovox horn) users experience an organic, mid-range, vintage sound. Master metal fabricators have crafted the horns using some of the same manufacturing methods used in the 1920s (the horn is made in China and assembled in Itasca, Illinois). The cone component is spun on a lathe and the neck is stamped out of sheets of steel. Afterward, these parts are hand-welded together, polished, and powder-coated black. The inner cavity of the walnut wood base (which I wish was a bit more elegant than a brick-shape) is CNC-milled to accommodate the horn hole, speaker, and …

Viora Cup Lid

You probably don’t spend too much time thinking about the design of your disposable coffee cup lid, but Viora would like that to change. Viora’s one-time-use lids, available wholesale to better coffee shops such as Astoria Cafe and Brooklyn Roasters in NYC and Go Get Em Tiger in Los Angeles, claims to offer a better drinking experience akin to sipping out of your favorite mug at home. We’ve become so accustomed to drinking differently from lidded cups that we don’t even realize how different we position our mouths in the process. The small opening of conventional lids means you need to be extra careful not to burn your mouth at first taste, and you can’t blow on the beverage without taking the lid completely off (a process that I usually regret once I’ve spilt hot tea on myself). With Viora the experience is a bit different — you drink your coffee or tea from a drink well in the lid that is designed specifically to prevent spills. The well also gives you a better chance …

ClickTape Tape Dispenser by Derk Reilink

Dutch designer Derk Reilink has a reason to be in a good mood. Having just exceeded his Kickstarter campaign goal by a thousand euros, Reilink will finally see his dream of bringing his ClickTape tape dispenser concept to market — a process that first began back in 2006 — with production starting at the beginning of August. Retailing for $14 (including the tape) ClickTape has reduced the dispenser to its bare essentials. A flexible plastic ring, made of 12 grams of plastic, allows a role of tape to be easily clicked into the dispenser, eliminating the need of a plastic roller used in traditional tape dispensers. A durable stainless steel blade matches the curvature of the ring shape of the dispenser and a special indent above the blade makes it easy to grab the end of the tape (something that is tricky for young kids and those with disabilities to do). ClickTape will come in black, blue, turquoise, and green and is sleek enough to earn a coveted space on even the most minimal of desks.   All images courtesy …

TERA Interactive Fitness Mat from Lunar Europe

Sometimes when I see a new product design I think to myself, “damn, that’s exactly what I imagined the future would be like.”  Well, the future of exercise equipment is closer than you think, and it looks like something Sandra Bullock would use in her next sci-fi movie. The TERA fitness mat by LUNAR Europe is the latest concept from the design firm to join a family of interactive objects including the VELA cycle trainer and the NOVA climbing wall. Made of eco-friendly shear wool by Kvadrat, TERA is a carpet with an intelligent surface that recognizes movement patterns and activates a specially developed TERA app. The circular shape of the mat is designed to accommodate the natural radius of human motion during exercise, and the app guides users through training units of different disciplines like Yoga, Pilates, or Thai Bo, all with varying degrees of difficulty. Sensors register any pressure exerted on the mat, enabling accurate detection of the user’s body and weight shifts. An innovative LED lighting system shows how to perform the …

Clug Bike Clip by Hurdler

What I found most interesting about this new bike storage solution by the Vancouver-based design firm Hurdler Studios is not the stripped-down design, but the fact that in addition to selling the product through traditional methods, the manufacturers are pursing a new digital sales model where customers can purchase Clug’s 3D printer-ready digital files to be used on a 3D printer like the Markerbot Replicator 2 that the designers used to design the product.  The Hurdler team, currently raising funds for the product on Kickstarter, has been testing the product for several months to ensure it’s robust enough for everyday use. The Clug system encases two screws concealed within a push-fit cover that mounts to a wall or other surface to hold the bike upright without damaging the bike frame or rims. The small size has an added benefit for renters — you won’t have to worry about damaging walls and forfeiting your security deposit. And now that you can easily store your bike in your apartment, you won’t have to deal with the stress …

The Alarming Clock

The Alarming Clock, created by Scottish designers Natalie Duckett and Lee Murray, is a reinvention of the typical alarm clock. When the morning alarm is programmed, the evening alarm is automatically set to signal nine hours ahead to remind you when it’s time to start unwinding for bed. The clock’s face remains hidden on the base of the alarm so all you see is a little wooden box with a beak in the middle. Handcrafted from natural oak, the Alarming Clock has passed CE safety testing. In place of the typical (and dreaded) electric buzz, the alarm signal is mechanically created to imitate the sound of a woodpecker tapping against a tree. Placing the small wooden “beak” against different surfaces or objects (say a glass of water, a book cover, or a metal box) alters the sound. To shut off the alarm you simply touch the top, and when no alarm is required, you just remove the beak and the alarm is silenced. The clocks are currently only available in Europe with a 4 to 8 week lead time, but if there is …