All posts filed under: Things for Working

Kickstarter Things: RE.BIN Recycling Bin

Paper bags are so versatile. They can either be the arts and crafts project or the thing you put under the arts and crafts project. They can be reused several times before ripping, are easily recycled, and when folded up properly don’t take up that much space. Unless you go shopping every week, which people tend to do. Then they start accumulating in an unmanageable pile, (which is particularly troublesome in small apartments) and you just want to switch to plastic (but you really don’t). So isn’t it brilliant when someone develops a new way to use up those paper bags while also recycling other garbage as well? Currently raising funds on Kickstarter, RE.BIN is a paper grocery bag shaped bin designed to hold your paper bag as a liner so that you can easily carry out the trash when it’s full. Made in the U.S.A. of 100% recycled plastic, RE.BIN is designed specifically to help save space in smaller, urban apartments. Recycling garbage in recycled bags supported by a bin made of recycled garbage – kind of the ideal sustainable product. Images …

Grids & Guides (Red): A Notebook for Visual Thinkers

Valentine’s Day approaches. You can’t give them chocolates because they are on a diet. Flowers die so quickly. Tickets to see Hamilton on Broadway? Yeah, right! Why not try Grids & Guides (Red): A Notebook for Visual Thinkers instead? This type of gift says,”I know you are a creative, thoughtful person, who needs to express yourself. Write it down, then share it with me later over cavier and souffles.” Or something like that. Ideal for architects, designers, or anyone who likes to sketch, the 160-page, cloth-wrapped notebook includes eight repeating graph paper patterns (including some new grid designs) and a variety of useful charts covering knot-tying, logic expressions, perspective projection, a world map, and more. $16.95 from Princeton Architectural Press and other book sellers.   Images courtesy Princeton Architectural Press.

Kikkerland’s China Design Challenge

At an event held last month at the company’s shop in Manhattan, Kikkerland presented finalist designs from the Kikkerland China Design Challenge, an competition held in collaboration with Beijing Design Week Organization and Redstar Design Fund. Held during Bejing Design Week 2014, the theme of the challenge was “A Passage Into Design,” which encouraged young talented Chinese designers to present unique ideas based on Chinese heritage, history and mythology. The ideas also had to exhibit the quirky sense of humor and wit characteristic of Kikkerland Design. Nearly 1,000 design submissions were received, from which 30 were selected and prototyped during a workshop with professionals. Ultimately, 17  finalists were chosen from the challenge. During the New York event, an award was presented to challenge winner  Zhou Yi, who designed the Hutong Eraser, an eraser that represents the disappearing traditional architectural style that was once prominent in Beijing. “As the streets of Beijing are filled with more and more high-rise buildings, there are less and less Hutong style streets left,” says Yi. “The eraser will disappear as you use it, like the the disappearing Hutong.” The eraser, along with eight other finalists’ designs, will be produced and sold worldwide …

Sun and Moon Miyamoto Watch by Mr Jones Watches

London-based Mr Jones Watches has launched their latest unusual timepiece, and this one will appeal to the old-school gamers out there. Named after the designer of the Super Mario video games, Shigeru Miyamoto, The Sun and Moon Miyamoto Watch features graphics inspired by the cartoon landscape of the world of Mario that many of us know only too well. Printed and assembled by hand in the watchmaker’s London workshop, the watch is produced in an edition of 100 pieces with each one numbered on the back of the case. The case is made of brushed stainless steel and the strap is navy and grey leather with pink stitching. “Sun and Moon” watches were first produced in England in the late 1600s during a period of experimentation with ways to represent the time. The position of the sun or moon in the crescent-shaped sky indicates the hours. As the hour disc rotates, the landscape changes from day to night. The minutes and seconds are displayed in the center dial and these run in the conventional way, so each …